Trey Ratcliff’s Complete HDR Tutorial

What’s New in this Tutorial?

What’s new? It’s 100% new! I’ve been doing this for years and years, and I share all of my new tricks, workflow, and post-processing techniques that will give your photos a great and unique look.

Even more important — maybe this is unexpected — through this tutorial I will help you find your own style of photography.

What’s Included?

There are over 10 hours of detailed video instruction in the course. It is aimed first at beginners but there is plenty of intermediate and advanced material too. I edit a ton of photos in every possible situation: Indoor, Outdoor, Sunrise, Sunset, Mid-Day, Mixed Indoor-Outdoor, Action, Movement, People, Nature & Landscape, Architectural, Travel, and more. There are many hours of high-production quality video as you watch me set up in these conditions, and then many more hours of screen capture, as you see me edit the photos you just saw captured in the field.

Even better, you get all of my RAW files! So you can follow along, step-by-step, and see exactly how I do each and every move.

Recorded copy of a Q&A and Photo Critique session with Trey

You also get to join our private Stuck In Customs Clubhouse community, where you can share your experience or ask questions to others in the clubhouse. It’s a great place for enthusiasts of all levels.

As usual, if you’re not mega-happy, you can have all your money back! It’s no problem. We have actual humans standing by to help you out with every little problem, big or small.

What do I need to get started?

All you really need is this video course. You can get demo versions of the software I use, so that shouldn’t be an issue. During the course I use Photomatix, Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Photoshop and the Nik Collection.

What’s covered during the 10+ hours of instruction?

  • Thoughts on HDR and it’s role in photography
  • Setting up your Camera!
  • Basics of HDR
  • Light Levels, noticing HDR situations
  • More Lighting in HDR + Composition
  • Sunrise HDR + Noise Reduction
  • Movement + HDR
  • Composition + Shadows + Sky
  • Wide and narrow composition for landscapes
  • High Action Single RAW HDR
  • Path, Halo Prevention, Sky from multiple parts
  • Extreme HDR
  • Low Light HDR
  • Interior HDR with special texturizing tricks
  • Manual Panoramic HDR
  • Evening HDR with steadiness, reflections
  • Indoor/Outdoor HDR
  • Movement in delicate HDR situation
  • Extreme Noise Reduction in Photoshop
  • HDR Experimentation and violent recomposition

FREE 40 Minute Preview!

A sneak peek into the 10+ hours of instruction

 

“What surprised me the most was Trey’s teaching methodology in terms of the exploration. It’s not about do step 1, step 2, step 3 now look at the result. It was about experimentation.”

Al Tufts, San Jose, CA

 

A few of the images included in the course

 

And here are some of my favorite HDR images where I’ve used these techniques!

The Bamboo Forest While exploring Kyoto, I eventually found my way to this fanciful bamboo forest.  There had been a light rain most of the morning and everything was quite lovely.  The rain does strange things as it moves its way through these sorts of trees.  I waited and waited, and that was nice too.  In the early afternoon, the rain stopped while the sun peeked through the top.  It shone down while the earlier rain misted down from the tops of the trees.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Inception: New York I took these photos in New York City before going to LA to prepare for Burning Man. I found this spot below in midtown during a walk from Bryant Park over to the Facebook HQ in NYC. If you check my Facebook page, you’ll see some photos that Luke shot of me while I was taking this shot. It’s the one when I was awkwardly up under my camera shooting almost straight up in the air! You know that position…- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Long Road to New Zealand This is one of countless beautiful roads that crisscross New Zealand.  I'm afraid I've forgotten exactly where I was when I took this photo!   I know that is very lame, but I bet people around here can help me pinpoint the area.As far as the camera settings, this is the kind of shot you can get with something called "compression," a method where you use a zoom lens and zoom in quite far.  It takes images in the distance and makes them larger than life.- Trey RatcliffRead more here at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Approaching Mount Fuji from the Old Village What a perfect place this is!I’ve been to Japan many times, but I never had the chance to visit Mt. Fuji! This time, Tom and I made a point to do it, and this was one of our fist stops. You can see much more about it in the video above!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

A Neo-Rockwellian Christmas When dad is a photographer, then there is a major degree of pressure to deliver photos on all the requisite holidays and celebrations! So, I decided to try to re-invent the family Christmas photo with HDR. Please note that many of my inventions go down in flames, but, as Winston Churchill said, “success is the ability to go from one failure to the next with no loss of enthusiasm”.Christmas scenes have a lot of light levels. The lights on the tree, the deep greens withn the branches, a roaring fire, lights in the room, reflections off the ornaments, and the like. It’s wild! I’m pretty sure this is why people like Christmas scenes so much - a wonderful treat for the eyes that is rich in texture and rich in light. Traditionally, it’s been very difficult to capture so much richness in a single photo, saving a lucky and heroic combination of shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and lenses.The tree lights made the faces of my three stunt-children (who are also my real children) glow perfectly. No flash could have achieved this, unless you are the kind of Rambo-flash guy that would go bury one inside the tree to hit their faces from the left. But, let’s face it. That’s hard.This was a 5-exposure HDR. You will notice that I often use 5 exposures, but note I could have done it with 3 exposures at -2, 0, and +2. Some silly Nikon cameras, like the D3X I use, will not let you step by twos, so I had to take 5 at -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2. The middle exposure, from which the kid’s faces were masked in and perfectly lit, was shot at f/4 aperture, shutter speed of 1/250, 100 ISO, and at 28mm.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Private Pool at Hearst This is the second photo of this pool I have published. It’s from the other side — the wider side. How cool would it be to have a little party in here. Let’s set that up!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

TREY RATCLIFF’S COMPLETE HDR TUTORIAL

In this course, I reveal 100% new stuff! In the first hour, you’ll know all the basics, and beyond that, you’ll learn an amazing collection of new tricks, workflow, and post-processing techniques that will give your photos a great and unique look. Excellent for any skill level, from beginner to advanced.

BUY NOW

10+ HOURS OF DETAILED PHOTOGRAPHY INSTRUCTION

I demonstrate, step-by-step, how I set up my camera, compose the shot and edit it during post-processing in every possible situation: Indoor, Outdoor, Sunrise, Sunset, Mid-Day, Mixed Indoor-Outdoor, Action, Movement, People, Nature & Landscape, Architectural, Travel, and more.

Your purchase includes:

  • 10+ hours of videos
  • My RAW image files
  • Stuck in Customs Clubhouse
  • Recorded copy of Q&A and Critique session with Trey

  • http://www.photoker.blogspot.com Alfred Sumawang

    oh my…. superb…

  • treyratcliff

    Thanks! :)

  • Ramesh

    Bought this tutorial a little while ago, and it was quite informative. It’s interesting how processes evolve over time and in fact, in most cases are simpler. It’s awesome that you are able to share these processes and workflows with us and I’m learning so much from you. Software and uses – yes, but mostly inspiration. I’ve been thinking so much about photography these days , after ignoring it for so long. Maybe some day, I’ll surprise myself and make an awesome photo with creativity that I was sure was absent from me all these years. :)

    Thank you Trey. This is my 3rd tutorial and things keep getting better and better. Keep up the good work.

  • Jonathan Button

    Hi Trey

    I’ve just watched your teaser video and think its an awesome job. Now I just have to buy your tutorial and find 10 hours to watch it. I do have a question from the tutorial. I noticed you exported JPEGs images from Lightroom to import into Photomatic Pro. I know you always shoot in RAW so I was wondering why you didn’t import the RAW images instead? I shoot with canon so I normally import the *.CR2 images. Which should I be using?

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