HDR with Google Glass

On This Week in Tech Today

I’ll be on with Leo Laporte, Om Malik, and Dwight Silverman today (Sunday) at 3 PM PT, 6 PM ET. You can watch live at http://live.twit.tv/ . If you’re around Petaluma and want to say hi, stop by! I’ll be sharing some new photos from travels and the Glass. We’ll probably also talk about stuff from Google I/O and other random tech geeky awesome stuff…

HDR with Google Glass?

I think I figured something cool out, although it is an absolute hack. But, that’s okay. I mean, if you can get the light, then you get the light. If you think about it, using Auto-bracketing on a regular camera (like a DSLR) to get an HDR is kind of a hack, since that’s not even the purpose of auto-bracketing. Today’s photo below shows the hacked effect working from a Google Glass photo. I have a lot more testing and research to do, and I’ll share it soon. It’s different than the usual HDR Tutorial (which was just re-written from the ground-up less than two weeks ago, by the way!).

An All-Glass Album

I made an All-Glass album over on Google+. I’ve been experimenting a lot with taking photos with Glass. And before you ask, regular visitors to the site (hi!) know that I post-process unapologetically. To me, the first photo is just a sketch. As long as you get enough light and color with an interesting composition, the rest of the light is yours to bend to your will. But yes, all these photos were taken with Google Glass. Some were taken on the San Francisco PhotoWalk a few days ago!

HDR Photo

Daily Photo – Running down to the Beach

I was going down to the beach when I decided to get some quick photos up here with Glass. It didn’t take too long. Man, I sure do wish they were RAW files, but sadly they are just JPGs. It’s not the end of the world, but still… it’s a little limiting. Anyway, as you can see, the waves were crashing in and the weather was wonderful… I guess that makes up for the lack of RAW files! :)

Actually, maybe one of you smart people can tell me why tiny cameras like this and iPhones and Androids can’t make RAW files. I don’t know the technical reason. I assume it has something to do with sensor size and how much light it can collect, but some of that hardware stuff is beyond my ken.

After I got down there, I took a photo of the Natural Bridge, which you can see in the album above.

HDR with Google Glass Santa Cruz

Running down to the Beach

Photo Information

  • Date TakenMay 18, 2013 at 7:50pm
  • CameraGlass 1
  • Camera MakeGoogle
  • Exposure Time1/350
  • Aperture2.5
  • ISO60
  • Focal Length3.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramProgram AE
  • Exposure Bias

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  • susan ratcliff

    Beautiful shots – that looks so fun to do! Great to have nothing to carry! :)

  • Trey Ratcliff

    Thanks!

  • http://intergalacticphotographic.com/ Matt Kaiser

    At the risk of sounding stupid (I’m sure someone will correct me if I get it wrong), the first thing that pops into my head for your question about RAW is: who says they can’t make RAW files? I mean, RAW is basically just the “pure” data straight from a sensor without the jpeg algorithms applied, right? So maybe it’s just that the manufacturers designed it so these devices just automatically process to jpeg. Probably with the thought process that most people using a mobile device are going for portability and rapid fire photo work. Which is usually the opposite of what people think about RAW. Also, they’d have to develop their own RAW format container (like Canon and Nikon have different “versions” of RAW) and a way for the device OS to process and understand RAW, yes? Obviously I’m not an engineer by any means, so this is all just hypothesis. Interesting question though.

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