The Long and Twisty Road

Why Twisty Roads?

Why do we like looking at twisty roads? I would love it if I could find a psychological analysis of this… there must be some reason…

If anything, I think it might be related to that other larger phenomenon I have mentioned before. That idea that our pleistocene-savannah brains like to see: fresh water (survival), trees (shelter), open plains (predators), vast skies (weather), and paths (game or human habitation). It may just be related to that last one.

Daily Photo – The Long and Twisty Road

I lament I can’t remember exactly where this is in Iceland. I think it was up by lake Myavatn, but I’m not totally sure.

That word Myavatn is related to little mosquitoes. I wondered why it had that name until about 5 AM one day. There were millions… and I mean millions of mosquitoes that came out of nowhere! It was one of those weather-things were the temperature is just perfect and they get up and go crazy for a few hours before settling down again. I had to retreat into the car mostly for reasons of sanity!

The Long and Twisty RoadI lament I can't remember exactly where this is in Iceland.  I think it was up by lake Myavatn, but I'm not totally sure.  That word Myavatn is related to little mosquitoes.  I wondered why it had that name until about 5 AM one day.  There were millions... and I mean millions of mosquitoes that came out of nowhere!  It was one of those weather-things were the temperature is just perfect and they get up and go crazy for a few hours before settling down again.  I had to retreat into the car mostly for reasons of sanity!- Trey RatcliffRead more here at the Stuck in Customs blog.

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  • http://timetotakepictures.blogspot.com Keith Moyer

    This is awesome! So much for the eye to take in. Great work!

  • http://lifeinacannedham.blogspot.com Cheryl Keeffe

    Before I even read the caption I knew that was Iceland! There’s no other place that looks like that, except perhaps the moon – but I’ve never been there, so wouldn’t know.

  • Patrick Ahles

    Stunning nature in Iceland.

    You should use a GPS-tracker, Trey. Then you can always retrace your steps. I’m willing to carry it for you, if you think it is too much of a burden… :P

  • Andy Bird

    Wow it seems like an age since i’ve posted anything here – great stuff…..as usual! :)

    Winding roads – I like them because they aren’t straight, sometimes I think straight lines are boring. I think the winding road thing relates in some way to the need to take a photo of every winding spiral staircase that we see even though you’ve probably done a dozen before that look exactly the same – well that’s what happens to me whenever I see one.

    Tiny mosquitos – we have them in Scotland and we call them ‘Midges’ they are a nuisance especially to foreign golfers hehe!

    So I’ve had my big trip for 2011 to Florida and naturally I have some good stuff I would like to share including some HDR stuff, starting with the one linked below :-

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrandybird/6146840995/

  • Big Matty

    Love twisty road pics. Thanks Trey.

  • http://www.nomadicpursuits.com Jim Nix

    very painterly Trey, well done!

  • http://www.thesharpshooter.co.uk thesharpshooter

    If I had the ability to fly I would fly across this terrain.. the road, to me, resembles the path I would take across the hills…. that’s what draws me to this photo… thoughts?

  • casusan

    Oh wow – sooo beautiful – perfect Trey!

  • Stephen Clarke

    I love winding roads for a couple of reasons… as a race car driver I desire to pick off the perfect fastest line through the apex of each turn. I love the mental/physical challenge. This is almost always a compromise, because the exit of one apex often puts you at an inappropriate location for the optimum apex through the next corner and thus a resultant loss of speed. It is a challenge that pits the mind’s ability to perform a myriad of split second mental distance, time and mass calculations vs the immutable earthly limitations of centrifugal force vs. the mechanical limitations of the vehicle. yet the eye can traverse those curves with a freedom, speed and grace that the body can only dream about.

    As a photographer I love the beauty of the the curve and the way that this leads my eye through the photograph. Waving curves like this road, seem to be part of our very make up and a fundamental part of the experience that makes us who we are. As a child, who of us has not put their arm out window of a moving car as our hand slides through a series of graceful waves against the pressure of the wind. The perfect photograph, the perfect curve and wave trace the arc of phi… the golden ratio, the design of ourselves and the world around us.
    -Steve

  • George

    Beautiful – one of your best. Nature hates straight lines. I hate straight lines – boring. So we both love curves. Nature makes wonderful curvy thing. None of them the same. Always different and interesting – sometimes relaxing – sometimes exiting. The curves of the river, the road, the mountains and the clouds all come together with a wonderful composition. Love it.

  • http://simonmorris.me/ Simon Morris

    Beautiful shot Trey – very dreamlike, excellent! The more I keep viewing your images of Iceland, the more they remind me of New Zealand… particularly where I live here in North Canterbury – stunning!
    Enjoy! :-) http://simonmorris.me/2011/08/01/tempting-swim/

  • Paul

    trey…ive followed the site pretty much since you began…this is one of the better shots you’ve put up. compelling.

    thx.

  • michel latendresse

    The reason i like winding roads is because my eyes tend to follow its path and explore leisurely the environment around it. The curves create a relaxing mood for visual exploration, it slows my progress through the image (or the scenery) rather than allowing my brain to speed through a straight line.
    Nice image Trey this one does not have a strong HDR signature, it’s very subtle but very nice. Regards

  • Andrea Boyle

    Oh, what a gorgeous photo! I think it will become one of my favorites of yours! As for windy roads, I like my eye traveling through a picture and seeing that in a viewfinder is a coup for me. That said, I remember revisiting an old haunt in California last year for photos and finding the road had not improved. It was still a 60-70mph extremely windy road race over to the coast. I enjoyed it at 18 in a sports car, but not at 57 in a midsized car. It was a white-knuckle drive for me! Sometimes it is better to have the photo and recall the memories…

  • http://www.pixelstoproveit.com Eric Pearson

    My GTI is drooling right now. Thanks for posting, Trey. I haven’t visited here in a few weeks, been hitting G+ hard lately.

  • http://www.phuket-holiday.com Fabrice

    Beautiful photo, so many smooth textures, reminders me of Ireland. Thank you

  • http://www.stuckincustoms.com Trey Ratcliff

    hehe thanks very much :)

  • Stephen Clarke

    Have you ever seen any police radar on these roads Trey? If not, I’m moving to Iceland!

  • Gaurav Goyal

    Beautiful dreamy photo.

    Though the description of mosquitoes yanked me right off my dream. Now when I look at the lake on the left, all I can imagine is millions of mosquitoes.

  • http://www.guttormsen.dk Peter Guttormsen

    Hi Trey.

    Nope, Nada, sorry, I´m pretty sure this is not lake Myvatn, there´s no hillside like this one to the left at the lake. Looks like a fjord somewhere else to me. But nevertheless a great pic. Makes you wander what´s around the last corner in the road….

  • http://gallery.me.com/jodome Damian Galligan

    Iceland is an amazing place and the scenery is breathtaking. Perfect place to be if you like taking photos :-)

  • Aron Reynisson

    This is Hvalfjörður Trey, just outside of Reykjavik if you skip the tunnel under the Fjord. Regards
    Aron

  • Ripon Majumder

    Please come to my Sreemangal, Sylhet Division, Bangladesh & use your camera.

  • Arsaell Oskarsson

    Aron is correct. Name of the waterfall is Fossá, and the valley ahead is Brynjudalur. Since we got the tunnel under Hvalfjörður (Whale Fjord) this road is mainly drive by tourists, but of course also those that like the beautiful landscape there. Gone there several hundred times and never got bored.

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