New HDR Tutorial

Trey Ratcliff’s Photography, HDR, and Post-Processing Course

We have a new HDR Video Tutorial! Exciting! I just ate dinner with one of my students (and friends, now), Cliff Baise. He was down from Dallas and came to listen to my talk the other evening about blogging and photography… We talked a little about this new course, and I told him that I feel a little funny when people like him keep attending all of my various classes and stuff. I try to only put something out when it is new and fresh so there is not a lot of old, rehashed stuff. Anyway, I think you’ll enjoy it… and thank you Cliff for your kind words last night.

Here is a little video preview for you! To see more and get a full course listing, just visit the HDR Video Tutorial page.

Daily Photo – Nobody Needs Dramatic Sheep

I’ve posted two Iceland photos in a row! This is unlike me…yes, but I’m excited about Iceland. And, this is one of the photos I made in the video above.

I think people that rarely see sheep are fascinated by sheep. This is very confusing to people that spend a lot of time around sheep. I’m sure people in Iceland find that outsiders find sheep WAY too interesting. But, to us outsiders, we see these wonderful little white puffs, milling around… the gentle way they drift over the soft turf like clouds on a green sky

If you zoom in tight on this one, you’ll see there are actually three sheep there on the left… the one in the back is just being a little sheepish.

Nobody Needs Dramatic SheepI've posted two Iceland photos in a row!  This is unlike me...yes, but I'm excited about Iceland.  And, this is one of the photos I made in the video above.I think people that rarely see sheep are fascinated by sheep.  This is very confusing to people that spend a lot of time around sheep.  I'm sure people in Iceland find that outsiders find sheep WAY too interesting.  But, to us outsiders, we see these wonderful little white puffs, milling around... the gentle way they drift over the soft turf like clouds on a green sky...If you zoom in tight on this one, you'll see there are actually three sheep there on the left... the one in the back is just being a little sheepish.-Trey RatcliffRead more here at the Stuck in Customs blog.

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrandybird/5661243015 Andy Bird

    I saw a sheep licking a wooden fence post while out on a recent drive – they really crack me up sometimes hehe! I also like goats, who are just as crazy and slightly more outgoing! This is the best goat shot I got during my Easter break – I was really hapy with it, it’s mayb my best animal shot :-

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/mrandybird/5661243015

  • http://moscowmemory.blogspot.com/ moscow memory

    Today through about an hour of randomly clicking on sites today came to yours. I am so glad i got to find out about this page. I will be looking back here on a daily basis. I cant wait to see what you put on here next.

    http://moscowmemory.blogspot.com/

    This is our page. We have just started blogging our photos and designs this week. Hope you like

    Thanks for your photos. Inspiring

    M + M

  • Jez

    Ewe shouldn’t be sheepish about posting this fantastic shot. Nobody’s going to look at it and say bah humbug. After all, it’s not like you’re trying to fleece us. Sorry about ramming in those bad taste sheep jokes. I like the way the hill disapears into the clouds up tup. Oops, did it again – tup – Yorkshire dialect for a young male sheep. Sorry.
    Andy – the sheep licking the fence post was either after salt of minerals.
    I once went for a photo walk in a remote part of Ceredigion, Wales (about 99% of Ceredigion is remote, so that’s not too difficult) and had to skirt around a flock of sheep, not wanting to disturb them. They started walking off, along the route I wanted to go. Each time I turned they altered their course to match mine. Even if I ran to try and outwit them they soon caught up (Yeah, I know, the ignomony of not even being able to outwit a sheep!). I guess the last human they had seen was the shepherd who had led them out in the spring, and the next one they expected to see was the shepherd leading them down in the autumn, so they just behaved like good sheep and went with whoever. The long and the short of it was that the flock and I spent a good two miles in each others company. And I got lots of beautiful landscapes with a foreground of sheep.

  • Dennis

    Just like to put in my recommendation for anyone considering the Video Tutorial. Apparently this is from the Webinar which was a fantastic experience live but will still provide a ton of knowledge for anyone who missed it. I’ve already gone back over several classes and reviewed tips and pointers Trey gave us about so many different aspects of imaging, photography, HDR editing, and yes, in the veritable Trey style, life in general. And hey, if you waffled on the cost of the webinar you now get the whole thing for what looks to be half price. Personally, I consider the cost of the webinar worth every penny as going through the course live with Trey and the great gang of photographers who participated was a true learning experience. The fact that you have access to the Clubhouse with the opportunity to share with and learn from other HDR enthusiasts who will help you hone your abilities is just icing on the cake. Trey, thanks again for everything. Dennis

  • http://www.edithlevyphotography.com Edith Levy

    Beautiful shot as usual. I’m looking forward to checking out your new HDR Tutorial.

    Trey…do you ever get to Toronto, Canada for any speaking engagements?

  • Simon Morris

    Phew, blimey… the new HDR video tutorial looks immense, great effort Trey – reckon I’ll have to upgrade from the ‘old’ HDR tutorial that I recently purchased!
    Another gorgeous image of Iceland – I don’t often zoom in 100% however, I couldn’t resist it on this occasion… well, you did say so, yeah! ;-) It’s only when you start flicking around in the background, and relate to items such as fence posts in comparison to the size of the mountains, that you really begin to get a feel for the enormity of the landscape… very much like here on the South Island of NZ – but it still amazes me all the same!
    Have a fab weekend all – ciao ;-)

  • Larry (Eeyore)

    I like it, but haven’t I seen this one before? Or was it just a very similar one?

  • Larry (Eeyore)

    Oh excuse me, Trey, I see now it was just a similar shot.

  • Gail in Montana

    Love this photo, also, Trey!! Thanks for sharing. Looking forward to seeing more photos of beautiful Iceland!!! :-)

  • http://www.stuckincustoms.com Trey Ratcliff

    Thanks!

    Larry – yes – I’ve posted a few of this fjord before, but not of these sheepy sheep…

    Dennis – thanks very much for that comment! Glad you liked the webinar and have nice things to say about it!

  • http://timetotakepictures.blogspot.com/ Keith Moyer

    Beautiful shot! I can see why you are looking forward to your trip.

  • Richard (oldhickory49)

    Cool. This sounds basically like the webinar for under a $100 bucks. From the table of contents, it looks to be very comprehensive and well worth the money.

    I always love the iceland shots. Those are some very inquisitive looking sheeps!

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/graffitilogic Bill Dodd

    hehe. Love the title. Really enjoyed seeing you work on this one in the Webinar! Such a great shot, too.

  • SoCal Mike

    And what exactly did you do to get all the sheep looking at you!??

  • Susan

    Wonderful shot Trey – yes, these sheep are interesting to me too! The new hdr video looks fantastic!

  • http://www.flickr.com/cliffbaise Cliff Baise

    Hey, man…thanks for the mention, but I was there to see Anthony Campbell, the lawyer, not you. Seriously, though, I thought you’d appreciate a friendly face in the crowd. It was really a great discussion at the copyright meeting. I’ll certainly think twice now before putting my balls on a public bike at Burning Man.

  • http://Www.shotbyrobins.com Gareth Robins (Auckland Wedding Photographer)

    I’m from New Zealand – sheep are evil

  • http://maugiart.wordpress.com/ Noah Katz

    I too participated in the webinar and can safely say it was worth every penny spent! Gaining access to the clubhouse and meeting several other photographers, getting my stuff critiqued and inputting on other peoples photos has helped me immensely. I wasn’t sure how much I’d get out if after following Trey for 3 years now and purchasing all his ebooks and paper back book and reading his posts daily bu, wow, did I learn a ton of new stuff. I think 100 bucks is a killer deal do if you haven’t yet, do yourself a favor and get it. I’ve been going back to revue classes and I get something new out of them each time. I even started a photo blog myself with the kick start I got from the classes. Not sure I’ll be able to keep up with Trey’s photo a day but I’ve gotten about 8 or so posts daily so far.

    cheers,
    Noah

  • http://www.facebook.com/media/set/fbx/?set=a.100925489989186.1637.100002152054198&ref=pd Thelonious Gonzo

    11 hours? So you only put in half of the actual webinar content? :)
    I actually thought that the “dramatic sheep” comment was the funniest moment of the webinar. Right up there with your “greeking it up” comment on Youtube regarding Antonis looking studly.

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/edenbrackstone/ Eden Brackstone

    Glad you had a good catch up with Cliff, he’s been a contact of mine on Flickr for quite some time and we have exchanged many comments over time… Funny how we all end up meeting each other sooner or later!

  • Sherry London

    Trey, I took your live workshop and loved it. However,the sheep image was special to me. I am a handspinner (yes, I spin my own art yarns on a motorized spinning wheel) so sheep are always on my mind. I am a member of Ravelry, a site for knitters and spinners and there are always sheep-y things going on there. The high point of my year is the Maryland Sheep and Wool show (and sometimes Rheinbeck Sheep and Wool {grin}). Should you decide you need more photos of sheep, I am sure that Texas has its own local shows. You would be amazed at how many different breeds of sheep there are all around the world. I think you should be able to see this wonderful shot (not mine) of Wensleydale sheep (http://ny-image0.etsy.com/il_fullxfull.236785996.jpg) also known as the “rasta” sheep for their incredibly long curls. And I have spun Islandic wool as well…

  • Chuan

    I like seeing the cute young Lambs in Spring here in Ireland. It cheers me up after the long winter.
    I once had friends visit me from East Asia. They commented that the country-side was so lovely and green, but they were shocked that local people had dumped so much garbage in the fields! (Sheep from a distance.)

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