New Interview and the Silent Temple of Zhangjiajie

New Video Interview

I think you’ll enjoy this one… I did this with Dane Sanders who has interviewed all kinds of people. You can pop over to his website to see even more. I like Dane a lot, and you’ll get a pretty good sense of him in the video too. We talked about all sorts of stuff, and I put a little guide just below the video in case you want to jump around.

Beginning – About the NASA trip

8:15 mark - HDR and some introductory stuff

12:30 mark - Talk about balance of photography, life, and business

28:00 mark - The internet is about to boom.. digital art as a cultural influence… room for us all to grow together.

31:20 mark - Competition and how everyone can win (and, so, it’s not really competition)

39:00 mark – Creating photos to be accepted by other photographers and how to use your own unique life experience to create.

48:00 mark - Burning Man and my artistic approach

53:30 mark - Someone in chat asks to see my t-shrt, and then we talk about my future of content creation

Daily Photo – the Silent Temple of Zhangjiajie

Here’s another photo that I worked on during last night’s webinar class. It was a tough one! I was going through many different examples, and this was a good example of one of those mixed-light situations. It’s so easy and wonderful to experience in person, but so difficult to capture otherwise.

I took this in the middle of a serious trek in Zhangjiajie, deep in the southern part of China. It was one of the hardest single-day treks of my life. This part in the lowland forest was not too tough because it was relatively flat. There were little path problems here and there, but nothing too major. Most of the problems involved walking up and down these bitches. I probably should not call them that, but, honestly, when you are walking up on down them, it’s one of the words that keeps popping into your mind.

In a single day, I walked up and down those things twice, each time passing through these lowland forests… this was the calm before the storm of the ascent, and this little temple brought me some temporary peace.

The Silent Temple of ZhangjiajieHere's another photo that I worked on during last night's webinar class.  It was a tough one!  I was going through many different examples, and this was a good example of one of those mixed-light situations.  It's so easy and wonderful to experience in person, but so difficult to capture otherwise.I took this in the middle of a serious trek in Zhangjiajie, deep in the southern part of China.  It was one of the hardest single-day treks of my life.  This part in the lowland forest was not too tough because it was relatively flat.  There were little path problems here and there, but nothing too major.  Most of the problems involved walking up and down these bitches.  I probably should not call them that, but, honestly, when you are walking up on down them, it's one of the words that keeps popping into your mind.In a single day, I walked up and down those things twice, each time passing through these lowland forests... this was the calm before the storm of the ascent, and this little temple brought me some temporary peace.Read more here at the Stuck in Customs blog.

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  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/edenbrackstone/ Eden Brackstone

    Funny, I watched the Webinar live only a few hours ago when you processed this… And now it’s on the blog, haha. Great perspective on this one, I love photos that look up into the canopy. Only done one myself:
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/edenbrackstone/5263325964/
    The hut in the foreground really sells it though… On the subject of walking up and down those “bitchy” mountains, I’ll pass, hehe ;)

  • Susan

    Beautiful scene Trey – yes, so peaceful! Great job with this one – congrats again on the webinar! I bet Gonzo’s comment is coming soon – he keeps me entertained too – actually his photo after the webinar was great!

  • http://www.facebook.com/media/set/fbx/?set=a.100925489989186.1637.100002152054198&ref=pd Thelonious Gonzo

    Trey –
    #1 – Tonight was amazing. Almost 2 hours? Aint that a man? That’s a man.
    #2 – I enjoyed tonight even better than Sunday.
    #3 – How cool is Andrea? Really cool.
    #4 – I learned 3 things tonight. Two of them I knew I needed to learn and one of them was a real surprise. All three of these things are real advances for me and will be used every time I process a picture from now on. There is no question this webinar is worth the money. For those who haven’t already signed up I can tell you that the Hi-Def versions of each webinar that are quickly available in the clubhouse are even clearer than the live events. So signing up now and viewing the first two classes will be well worth it.
    #5 – Here’s my interpretation of the “Maybe Pagoda”
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/straight-nochaser/5708738443/in/photostream/lightbox/

  • http://www.jacquesgude.com Jacques

    Like T.G. said, session 2 of the Webinar was amazing. Really enjoyed those extra 50 minutes, beyond the hour, of watching you work your magic on those several shots. I learned more about how you think through your shots and then post-process. For me, paying the full 247 bucks was well worth it. Thanks for a great webinar, Trey.

  • PeterG

    It turned out great!
    I didn’t stick to the end since I needed an additional hour of sleep before getting up this morning :-), so I missed out on how you fixed the temple itself. That will be a challenge for me to resolve when I get back home on Thursday. Thanks!

    (Keep in mind that there can be a rendering latency in the webinar on 2-3 seconds between tweaking the sliders and the update of the picture so it’s good that you verbally express the expected outcome.)

  • http://JimiJonesVisuals.com Jimi Jones

    This was a really nice example of how to process a difficult situation. I learned a good deal from this example and the photo came out great.

    Good stuff!

  • Simon Morris

    Cool shot Trey – quite unique, what with capturing the temple whilst looking up into the canopy!
    Nice job at processing – always difficult when faced with such mixed lighting conditions… I especially like the greens too – perfect saturation for the yellows!
    Thelonious – another damn fine effort mate… dare I say ‘better’ than the Master himself? (hat, coat – I’m outta here!) ;-)

  • http://www.flickr.com/cliffbaise Cliff Baise

    The temple is one I might have given up on. It was truly amazing to watch you bring this piece together. Thanks for the extra hour of “Trey Time.” All hail the HDR Overlord.

  • Gail in Montana

    Great job on the photo, Trey. I love this one. Thanks for sharing. :-)

  • http://www.stuckincustoms.com Trey Ratcliff

    Thanks everyone – and glad you enjoy the style of everything… that is good because it’s the only one I have! hehe

  • http://www.lightasmagic.com Justin

    I had a great time watching this one get processed last night. There were quite a few hurdles to overcome, and it turned out great. Thanks for going over in the webinar last night. I promise not to expect it next time!

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/graffitilogic Bill Dodd

    Great shot as always, love the tones here!

  • http://younglesonphotoblog.wordpress.com/ Barbara Youngleson

    Trey, I could not let more time go by, without telling you what a wonderful asset Andrea is to your team. I was facing some self-inflicted registration issues. Andrea resolved them, in a more than timely fashion, with professionalism and a sense of humor. And now we can all get back to doing what is most important – attending your Webinar!
    With thanks to you both,
    Barbara

  • Noah Katz

    Thanks for the extra hour last night Trey. Unfortunately I had to take care of my kids and missed the first hour which I’ll watch tonight, but getting a chance to see you take those photos to the finish line definitely made up for missing the live first hour.

  • Dave

    “Writer’s Block” for photographers… “Shutter Stopper” “Focus Fryer”?

  • http://www.flickr.com/photos/35422436@N06/ George Green

    Another great shot, but I don’t like the temple falling over. Some people like that I suppose, but I would have straightened it up in Photoshop.

  • http://artoftravelblogging.com Michael

    Haven’t heard of this part of China before. Looks beautiful. Not sure if I’ll have time to go that far south but I’ll have to add this to my wish list.

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