Happy Girls in Guangxi and more great feedback on The Arcanum

More Great Feedback on The Arcanum!

First, The Arcanum hit #8 of the Top 51 Websites for Learning Online. Amazing! That’s a great tribute the the team, the Masters, and the Apprentices! Thanks everyone!

And here are two wonderful Apprentices who made some lovely posts about their thoughts and experiences! The first is from Rose Fredriksen and the second is from Marjorie McDonald.

Daily Photo – Happy Girls in Guangxi!

One night I went out in the rain to take photos while staying in the little town of Yangshao. It was great fun! I was using my Sony A7r and my Leica 35mm f/1.4 which requires manual focus. Naturally, this means I need both hands to take photos. Luckily I had my guide Andy with me to help hold the umbrella!

Happy Girls in Guangxi!

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/500
  • Aperture
  • ISO4000
  • Focal Length
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias

Feeding Chooks in Feng Huang

Chook Update

In addition to our new dog, my wife has also found it necessary to get three chickens. We built a special coup and stuff. And then after we built it, she decided she wanted it on the other side of the house. The chooks did not help with that move. And here we are, about 15 weeks into it, and these chooks have only laid THREE eggs. She says it’s because their too young… I don’t know what to believe any more with these damned things.

Daily Photo – Feeding Chooks in Feng Huang

When in Feng Huang, I decided to go down to the river to take some photos. There was a direct way, but I thought it might be more interesting to zig-zag my way there through alleys. One of the most wonderful things about China is how safe it is. I never had any fear for my life or anything as I move around these places. It’s so safe, in fact, that it’s almost eerie! But, eerie in a good way, of course…

Chickens China Feeding

Feeding Chooks in Feng Huang

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • Camera
  • Camera Make
  • Exposure Time
  • Aperturef/1.4
  • ISO1600
  • Focal Length50mm (50mm in 35mm)
  • Flashflash did not fire
  • Exposure Programaperture priority
  • Exposure Bias

Thanks for all the nice feedback on the new tutorial!

As regular visitors know, we get a lot of new traffic here via my two tutorials. I basically created them because I was getting literally dozens of emails per day asking how I do these photos. I always feel bad totally ignoring people, but I just don’t have time to email back everyone. Instead, I put together two tutorials. The first HDR Tutorial is a free and has helped thousands of people get into HDR Photography. The second, newer tutorial is on Texturing has over an hour-long video and includes 100 hi-res textures. I selected them from over 2,000 textures and refined them down to just the best!

Here is some feedback from tutorial dowloaders!

Jeff Clow: “This collection of textures is truly world class – and by that I mean not simply how brilliant they are, but the fact that they’ve been compiled from fascinating places around the world. The unique textures work superbly well as backgrounds and overlays, and I highly recommend them to any photographer who wants to improve and enhance their images. This texture package is ‘must have’ tool for any serious photographer.”

Scott Dungan: ” What a resource! Stuck in Customs World of Textures has provided me with textures that are difficult or impossible to produce in Photoshop. These textures allow me to produce images with the hand coated look of early photographic processes. Thank you for your World of Textures Stuck in Customs.”

Scotty Graham: “I just downloaded the premium package, and am very impressed with both the quality of the textures and the video tutorial. Trey’s video tutorial is worthwhile to the professional as well as the Photoshop beginner. As a professional photographer, I enjoyed watching Trey’s workflow and creative process unfold right before my eyes….(would be nice to see the same kind of thing with his HDR images). His textures are bar-none some of the best I have seen and/or used. They rival anything else you may see for sale on line, and for 100 textures, his price is very fair. If you are looking to move your photography style up one notch, don’t hesitate to purchase this package….you will not regret it.”

Chris Nowakowski: “All I have to say is WOW! These textures are amazing! They blow everything and anything that I have seen out the water! The video tutorial is so easy to use, even the pro that I am, I still learned a few new tricks! I still remember when I first heard about you and I used your tutorial on HDR to further develop my skills. That tutorial helped me make the art I do today. Now, with this tutorial not only am I not worried about getting my ROI out of it, but I also know that it will inspire me as an artist to further per sue my photography and take it to new heights. It’s hard to sum it all up. All I know is that this rocks as much as you do.”

Thelonius Gonzo: “Just viewed the tutorial. I know dollars are worth something (less and less everyday) but honestly, if you are interested at all in texture effects, and like me, are not already a Photoshop expert, then this tutorial is well worth the asking price. I swear I may need a few weeks to really ingest all of it. The only downside of this is that I feel like I’m cheating.”

Below are a few shots with the effect:

Icelandic Horse, Stuck in Textures

Frozen in Time

Happy New Year!

I hope everyone has a GREAT 2016… I think it’s gonna be an amazing one! I don’t really make New Year Resolutions, although I know it’s kind of a popular thing. I’m usually pretty good about making Completely Arbitrary Resolutions, and I do them randomly and just put them into motion immediately. This method has varied success.

Traveling Ratcliff Photo Circus Around The World!





I know I’ve done 3 days in a row here… I can’t commit to it because all this takes a lot of time and work, actually! But we did do some amazing things today that were worth capturing. It started out with all of us in a party van with a mirrored ceiling for a short ride to get on a boat. We took the boat for about an hour to visit four small islands around Phi Phi. They were amazing and we had a great time snorkeling and swimming. Where are they exactly? See This Google Map. We ended with a lunch on Bamboo Island before coming back… and pretty much after we got back, it was time to visit CoCo the baby elephant on the beach! CoCo is 3 years old and it was on the way to being a circus elephant, but the group here rescued him and now he does nothing but rest and relax and eat! Sounds nice… they say that chain is on him when in public because sometimes boats scare him and he runs wild!

Right before Coco walked home for the evening, the owner stopped for a moment for Scarlett to give a final snack for the night as the sun was setting.

from Trey Ratcliff at http://www.StuckInCustoms.com

Daily Photo – Right before Coco walked home for the evening

The owner stopped for a moment for Scarlett to give a final snack for the night as the sun was setting.

Right before Coco walked home for the evening

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • CameraH5D
  • Camera MakeHasselblad
  • Exposure Time1/125
  • Aperture4
  • ISO400
  • Focal Length35.0 mm
  • Flash
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias

People of Papua New Guinea Part 5

Top Questions Answered!

So, we’ve been looking at the comments about the New HDR Software from all different networks, newsletter, blog, and more! I thought I’d take a moment to answer some of the most common!

1) Does Aurora HDR do Luminosity Masking?
YES! Like, totally.

2) Is there a Windows Version Coming?
We’re talking to the team about it, so, yeah based on your outspoken feedback PROBABLY! haha… Look, I get it. This new software was released the same day as Fallout 4, and I bought that on Steam before I realized it was Windows ONLY! OMG I was gutted… I’m a huge gamer. I’m thinking about getting a Windows laptop JUST to play that game, which seems ridiculous, but I’m actually really thinking of it!

3) Can I do “Milder” HDRs?
Of course! You can set the opacity to whatever you wish. Everyone has their own tastes, and that’s supa cool. All the samples I show you on the webpage at http://www.stuckincustoms.com/aurora-hdr-software-for-mac/ are my “style” but you don’t have to go that extreme… or you can go MORE extreme. It’s all good… it’s creativity! :)

4) I don’t need Lightroom or Photoshop?
Nope! I still use Lightroom to organize my photos and to process some of them that don’t call for HDR, but I JUST use Aurora HDR Pro now. Also, thanks for all the suggestions… I’ve dropped lame Adobe Bridge and now using OnOne Perfect Browse for moving my photos around my computer and getting them ready for processing/sharing!

5) Is there a trial version?
NO! haha… BUT, if you’re not happy, you can have all your money paid back… we’re not worried about it! :)

Live on Facebook Video

Recently I went out to Glenorchy to Aro-Ha to see the hanging of one of my pieces. We did a little video while there and you can click here to see it!

Daily Photo – People of New Guinea Part 5

Well, this was an exciting moment. I didn't quite catch this chap's name, but it wasn't the first thing on my mind. Actually, I don't know why the first thing on my mind was to take a photo instead of run! Part of my nature, I guess.

Here's the full story… I was walking near the western coast of Papua New Guinea near a place called Tufi. Here's a map — it's a sinking volcano that makes a bunch of crazy jungled fjords. It's kind of a unique area for many reasons… one is that many of the local women permanently tattoo their entire face, starting from a very young age. I'll have a photo of that coming up soon…

I was there with my friend Rene and four other friends from Queenstown. We got a hot tip that we could take some canoes down one of the rivers with some natives that we knew through a connection. We all went and our plan was to visit a local village and drink in some of the local action.

After our canoe trip, which was quite beautiful and serene (you could sometimes see natives darting this was and that through the jungly bits), we came to a stop and disembarked. We had about three canoes and two locals with us. They spoke English pretty well and we started to head down a path to their village. At one point, they warned us that some of their tribe may come out with a show of force, so that added a tinge of excitement. And within a few minutes, these two guys with spears blasted out of the jungle with the same force that I blasted into my undies.

I couldn't totally figure out if they would follow through on the threat… I got the impression it was just the PNG equivalent of a Larry David staredown, which I find to be a more comical situation and highly preferable. Also I couldn't figure out if they just wanted to give us a tour of their village, or if they saw as a 6 creamy Twinkies.

Well, I figured, I could not beat this guy in single-hand combat since he was holding a Spear of +2 to Cannibalism. Since I was holding a Camera of +1 to Autofocus, I decided I'll try just to properly compose this, which could have been my last photo ever.

People of New Guinea Part 5

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/800
  • Aperture5
  • ISO320
  • Focal Length25.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramManual
  • Exposure Bias

Entering the Bar Atop the Burj Al Arab

3 Hot News Updates from The Arcanum! Raising Money, Pete News, and New Software that is mind-blowin’!

All in this video we just released – enjoy and let us know your feedback! :)

Craziest drinks ever

This Skybar has absolutely the craziest drinks ever… Here’s the crazy menu so you can kind of get the idea!

Daily Photo – Entering the Bar Atop the Burj Al Arab

What an amazing place this is! I never expected the entrance way to look like this. I thought maybe it would be more elegant… not like I’m walking into TRON or something. I didn’t know what to expect. In fact, it was so strange that I almost forgot to take a photo. Almost.

Entering the Bar Atop the Burj Al Arab

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time3.2
  • Aperture8
  • ISO200
  • Focal Length16.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias+2

Exploring Every Possible Path

Using Tripadvisor

I find myself using Tripadvisor more and more on trips to find hotels and places to stay. It’s a very handy resource, I must say… and it gets stronger every day with all the community feedback.

Daily Photo – Exploring Every Possible Path

There’s a little town beside Yangshuo and I can’t quite remember the name right now! But it was full of these tiny little alleyways and tunnels that darted this way and that. Here’s a quick scene I captured while there…

Exploring Every Possible Path

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • CameraILCE-7R
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/1250
  • Aperture
  • ISO3200
  • Focal Length
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramShutter speed priority AE
  • Exposure Bias-0.3

A Special Event in Wanaka and…a Panorama of Hong Kong

Upcoming PhotoWalks and events including the Venice Photowalk

We’re about to announce a whole new slew of photowalks and events! Be sure to check the Events page for more!

Follow me on Instagram

Here’s me, @TreyRatcliff ! And we also started a live-feed Instagram page here on the site!

DJI Inspire Review

We now have two quad reviews up! The newer one is the DJI Inspire Review, but we also have up the DJI Phantom Review.

An Instameet in Wanaka on Saturday!

I’m gonna pop over to Wanaka on Saturday to meet with a bunch of Instagrammers and have a fun day/evening of photos!

It sounds like a good group of people going, and it’s led by Liz Carlson, also known as Young Adventuress! People coming include Chris Burkard, Folk Magazine, Hello Emilie, Elizabeth Gadd, Matt Glastonbury, Johan Le Backpacker, Steen Jones, Matt Vandeputte, and Shaun Jeffers. We’ll all meet down by the famous tree in the lake at 4PM. I think any camera including mobile phones are cool. She tells me tags at #LoveWanaka and #InstameetWanaka and tagging @lakewanakanz. You can see more on Liz’s blog here!

Even though we’re meeting at the tree at 4PM, I’ll be at Gin and Raspberry a few hours beforehand having a wine! :)

P.S. This is the tree I’m talkin’ about, just ask any local if you’re driving in! :)

Peaceful Evening in Wanaka I had a peaceful evening in Wanaka. There is this tree that sits out in the middle of the lake. It’s so unusual. I love the way it reflects back on itself in the smooth water. I was by myself, listening to music on my iPod, and just watching the water as it would calm down then get excited, then calm down again. I swapped out lenses a few times and kept moving around to admire it from different angles. This one was one of my favorites. - Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Daily Photo – A Panorama of Hong Kong

I think this is still called Hong Kong even though it's across the bay in the Kowloon area. I was looking at some old photos of Hong Kong from about seven years ago, and I could see this building just in its beginning stages. Now it's complete, and quite magnificent as you can see! This was a panorama made from about four shots with the DJI Inspire.

A Panorama of Hong Kong

Photo Information

  • Date Taken
  • CameraFC350
  • Camera MakeDJI
  • Exposure Time1/351
  • Aperture2.8
  • ISO100
  • Focal Length3.6 mm
  • FlashNo flash function
  • Exposure ProgramProgram AE
  • Exposure Bias

HDR and Photoshop

How do I use HDR in Photoshop?

I get this question a lot! I have an answer for you, but it is not what you expect.

First off, I have a FREE HDR Tutorial for Mac or HDR Tutorial for Windows here on StuckInCustoms.com that describes the step by step process. You’ll see that Photoshop is sometimes part of the process, although I strongly recommend you use something else to do the “HDR” bit.

Do you primarily use a Mac to edit your photos? If so, then check out Aurora HDR Pro! I worked with Macphun for over a year to build the ultimate HDR software! If you’re primarily a Windows user then I would definitely use Photomatix Pro. I’ve used and recommended Photomatix Pro for many years. They gave me a Photomatix Coupon Code of “TREYRATCLIFF” that will save you 15%.

Quick Verdict for HDR on Mac

I don’t use Photoshop at all when using Aurora HDR Pro — this is because Aurora has layers and lets me fix everything right inside of there. Having said that, I may go into Photoshop in the end to use some content-aware-fill to get rid of annoying things like power lines or ugly birds. But I don’t use the HDR-in-Photoshop options…

Quick Verdict for HDR on Windows

Photomatix Pro 4.0 is the clear winner. Photoshop “Merge to HDR” is much better than earlier iterations of the software, but it has few other redeeming qualities.

Photomatix Pro:

  • Faster (MUCH FASTER – see the chart below)
  • Upgraded noise-reduction just for HDR
  • Better ghosting control
  • and more image control for higher quality images

Photoshop “Merge to HDR” Pro excels in:

  • Having one integrated solution right inside Photoshop
  • Easier to learn because there are a few less controls

Photoshop vs. Photomatix Pro Comparison

Note that this testing was done in CS5, although there have been no significant changes I can see since Photoshop CC has arrived.

Item Adobe Photoshop Photomatix Pro
RAW Photos – Loading 7 Images (before Tonemapping) 1:54 (Test 1)

2:01 (Test 2)

0:58 (Test 1)

0:56 (Test 2)

RAW Photos – I make adjustments, then click to process 0:50 (Test 1)

0:52 (Test 2)

0:08 (Test 1)

0:08 (Test 2)

RAW Total Processing Time (Average) 2:48 1:05
JPG Photos – Loading 7 Images (before Tonemapping) 1:01* (Test 1)

0:57 (Test 2)

0:41 (Test 1)

0:40 (Test 2)

JPG Photos – Loading 7 Images (before Tonemapping) 0:27 (Test 1)

0:29 (Test 2)

0:07 (Test 1)

0:08 (Test 2)

JPG Total Processing Time (Average) 1:27 0:48

* Photoshop Gives you a warning about not using JPG photos to make an HDR. You have to click “OK”, but I did not include that wait time in my timings.

Test Subjects and System:

I chose a 7-exposure session from a lake at sunset near Nikko, Japan. The exposures ranged from -3 to +3.

I have a speedy 17″ MacBook Pro. I bought it about 9 months ago — the specs are to the right.

In the Photoshop test, the only things running were Photoshop (in 64-bit mode), Bridge, and Skitch for taking screenshots. In the Photomatix Pro test, I kept those running + Photomatix Pro.

HDR-Photo

Photomatix Pro 4

Special Conditions:

Now, the Photoshop Merge to HDR Pro option does not allow me to turn on and off Auto-Alignment, Cropping, or anything else. Normally, I turn that off in Photomatix because I use a tripod. To keep the tests fair, I turned on the Align Source Images, Cropping, and Reduce Noise in Photomatix Pro. That way, it was doing the same tasks as Photoshop. However, in my normal conditions, I don’t have those turned on, which makes Photomatix even faster.

Also, as you can see I processed with RAW and JPG files. I preach in my HDR Tutorial that using JPGs is just fine. I don’t see any difference in quality. But, I do notice that JPGs are much faster. This is important!

Overall Speed

In these tests, Photomatix Pro 4.0 was much much faster. There’s almost no comparison.

Photomatix Pro processed the images in 1:05 — Photoshop did the same job in 2:48. It was more than twice as fast!

There are two intense “Computer Processing” periods. The first is when you load the images into the program. After this is done, the human takes over and adjusts the sliders. Then there is a second period of processing.

Speed – Loading the Images

Photoshop “Merge to HDR” was slow. Painfully slow! During the loading of the images, it give a few indications of why it is so slow. After a period of time it says “Aligning”. Then, after another bit, it says. “Transforming”. Then for another longer period, it says “Crop”. I did not touch the computer at all during this time… I kept the timer on my iPhone going to watch.

In these tests, the only thing I had running was Photoshop and Bridge. This is not typical. Note that I am usually running Google Chrome, Tweetdeck, Mail, and iTunes for music. So all the times you see in the chart are actually much higher, and the delta between Photoshop and Photomatix Pro grows even more.

My first broken test:

What I had running in the background for all the tests before the reboot:

  • Tweetdeck
  • Google Chrome with about 6 tabs (gmail, websites, nothing too taxing)
  • iTunes playing music
  • Photoshop
  • Bridge
  • Apple Mail & iCal
  • Skitch

The first time I ran it with Merge to HDR Pro, it took 6:05 (six minutes and five seconds) to load. Just amazingly slow! Then, I thought, “Well, I do have it in 32-bit mode,” since I was also running some old plugins. So I tried it again in 64-bit mode. I shut down Photoshop and re-opened. Then I did the Merge to HDR Pro option through Bridge again. The second time it took 13:10. THIRTEEN MINUTES. I was just about to Force Quit the program — I was sure something was wrong! How can this be — in 64-bit mode? Isn’t it supposed to be faster?

So I decided to reboot and try again. I was worried that maybe there had been a memory leak or something had just gummed up the works. Because thirteen minutes just didn’t make sense! Now, I am using big images from a Nikon D3X. And these were RAW files, but that still seems like way too long…

After I rebooted, I loaded NO OTHER PROGRAMS expect for Photoshop, Bridge, and Skitch. I did not like doing this for the test, because this is not a “normal” environment for me. I usually have several things running. This time, it was much faster and clocked in at 1:54. So, after this, I decided to restart the whole test and have nothing else running to keep the results as clean as possible.

Speed – Processing the Images

After you make your slider changes, you can process them. There is a period of waiting whilst the image processes. Again, Photomatix Pro was not just a little faster, but way faster.

For the RAW files, Photoshop took an average of 8 seconds and Photoshop Merge to HDR Pro took a whopping 51 seconds (two tests at :50 and :52).

And remember… I wasn’t doing anything else on the computer… I wasn’t checking the mail or tweeting or anything… just watching the water boil…

Photo Quality and Control

I’ve been using previous versions of Photomatix for years, so I am familiar with the sliders. Because I am a private tester, Photomatix would not allow me to post screenshots of the new GUI. However, it is very similar to previous versions.

The new Photoshop “Merge to HDR” dialogs are very similar to that of Photomatix Pro. However, they do not have nearly as fine control. There are about 1/3 as many sliders, which is good and bad. It’s good in terms of simplicity, but it is bad it terms of flexibility.

I find that there are so many different sorts of HDR shooting conditions. The more sliders you have to adjust one part of a photo for one condition and another for a different condition — the better. I’ve processed a bunch of images with both now, and I prefer Photomatix Pro. I get much more fine-grained control.

More importantly, I feel like I get more “pop” with the Photomatix Pro controls. It’s tough to explain… what do you think? What’s your experience with these tools so far?

HDR-Photo
HDR-Photo

The two above images are from Photomatix Pro 4.0 (left) and Photoshop Merge to HDR (right). Although it is probably hard to tell at this resolution, I believe the Photomatix Pro one has finer control. Both tools allow you to move the sliders around until you are happy with the image… so there is not really a one-to-one comparison possible here… Also, I did not show the new GUI for Photomatix Pro 4.0 at the request of the developer.

Better Ghosting Control

I remember when Merge to HDR Pro was announced that it had this cool feature for repairing ghosts. Ghosts are those nasty bits where part of an image is moving around in the various frames. A dog running across the bottom of the frame would be a good example.

Well, Photomatix Pro 1-ups Photoshop! It allows you to control various ghosts around the frame at the same time! Basically, there is an intermediate step where you can drag the mouse around one area and select a new single “source” image for that area, and then do it again for another section. For example, you may want to pick the dog from one exposure and the blowing tree from another. It’s great flexibility and very smart.

Noise Reduction for HDR

Photoshop did make some very nice changes with Noise Reduction, but that is part of the RAW import process. Since the Merge to HDR Pro option goes around that, you don’t get any of the good Noise Reduction for HDR images inside Photoshop.

Photomatix Pro 4.0 has a newer, more robust way to reduce noise. It even allows you to adjust the noise in the “input” images before they even begin the processing period. Smart.

The image there to the right was taken from a single RAW. As most of you HDR veterans know, noise at night is a big problem. The new Noise Reduction in Photomatix (which works even for a single RAW photo) really saved me a lot of time.

You can click on the image there to go see the full size on SmugMug. You’ll notice little white bits… they almost look like stars that I drew in, but they are falling sparkles from previous explosions

HDR-Photo

HDR Toning – Are you kidding me?

I was also intrigued by another little feature in Photoshop that all the videos were raving about. It is called “HDR Toning…” and it allows you to take your image inside Photoshop and give it an “HDR Look”. Cool, I thought! Well, I got in there to try it, and it told me that I had to Flatten the entire image first! That means, basically, that you have to take all of your layers and make them one. This is a deal-killer for me, since I like to have several layers open while I am working on an image.

Worse, it makes no sense! Most of the other Photoshop filters and controls work on a single layer without requiring the entire thing to be flattened. What’s up Adobe? You gotta fix that up… it’s sloppy.

HDR-Photo
HDR-Photo

The Final Photo – The Lake at Nikko

This place was Cold with a capital C, as you can plainly see.

And worse, I had forgotten my special little gloves with the flip-up fingertips. So I was goin’ finger-commando while trying to line up this shot. The wind was pretty stiff in my face. The wind always seems to be against you, eh? I think I just never notice it when it comes from any other angle.

By the way, there is only one place that is convenient to quickly warm up your fingers.

There is an older, historic part of Nikko that is about a 30 minute drive away. The drive is practically straight up a mountain, through a series of switchbacks. During the entire time up the mountain, I was surrounded by clouds. I thought it would be quite miserable at the top. But once I poked out, everything was free and clear. I was between cloud layers, exactly where this chilly lake sat at sunset.

HDR-Photo

HDR Photos for you made with a combination of Photomatix and Photoshop

Here are a few photos photos for you. You can see more on at my Portfolio. I make a new one every day here on the home page at StuckInCustoms.com, so you are welcome to come back daily! :)

The Bamboo Forest While exploring Kyoto, I eventually found my way to this fanciful bamboo forest.  There had been a light rain most of the morning and everything was quite lovely.  The rain does strange things as it moves its way through these sorts of trees.  I waited and waited, and that was nice too.  In the early afternoon, the rain stopped while the sun peeked through the top.  It shone down while the earlier rain misted down from the tops of the trees.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

 Moonrise Kingdom This is one of my favorite new pieces from this year! I just shot it a few days ago.It was shot waaaay after the sun went down in Big Sur, California. This is a crazy waterfall that pours off onto the beach. You can’t see it from the road, and it requires a short walk. I found it thanks to Stuck On Earth, although I am sure other locals have known about this semi-secret place forever! You can go here too… it’s not terribly difficult. It’s called “McWay Falls” and it’s beautiful any time of the day.Also, btw, I’d like to thank those of you that have been ordering more prints recently — I am honored! :) You can always click just below the photo to check sizes and prices to find something to fit your budget. Thanks again!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Downtown Beijing After Rain Just about the only time you get a break from the smog is after a good rain. I’m sure all that nonsense just ends up down on the ground and soaks slowly into the groundwater.Anyhoo, this is the CBD (Central Business District) of Beijing. And yes, I took this with the Sony NEX-7. I’m working on that other piece I mentioned above and will put it up on the blog soon!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Long Road to New Zealand This is one of countless beautiful roads that crisscross New Zealand.  I'm afraid I've forgotten exactly where I was when I took this photo!   I know that is very lame, but I bet people around here can help me pinpoint the area.As far as the camera settings, this is the kind of shot you can get with something called "compression," a method where you use a zoom lens and zoom in quite far.  It takes images in the distance and makes them larger than life.- Trey RatcliffRead more here at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Inception: New York I took these photos in New York City before going to LA to prepare for Burning Man. I found this spot below in midtown during a walk from Bryant Park over to the Facebook HQ in NYC. If you check my Facebook page, you’ll see some photos that Luke shot of me while I was taking this shot. It’s the one when I was awkwardly up under my camera shooting almost straight up in the air! You know that position…- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Mysterious Rock of Wonder The day in Death Valley was about 115 F (46 C). It wasn’t a dry heat either… there has been a lot of humidity here and there is flash lightning in the day and night. This location here took a lot of time, effort, and 4×4 to find. I took five gallons of water, a map, and some warnings from the place that rented the jeep that this area was inaccessible because of recent road wash-outs from rivers. Well, they were right! So getting the 4×4 over and through the washed out rivers took many more hours than expected. I only suffered one minor injury when my head slammed into the rollbar during a clumsy maneuver. But after I finally found this place I’ve always wanted to visit, it was late afternoon with plenty of time to hike around before night fell.I look forward to your theories (from the boring to the surreal) of what makes these rocks move across the playa on their own!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the entire post over at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Central Park in the Fall I had spent the afternoon alone while traveling (as usual, it seems) in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in the middle of New York City. It sits on the Eastern edge of Central Park.  It was a little cold outside, but I decided to walk across the park anyway, just as the sun was setting.  As I moved through the trees, I found this little place and thought it would be fun to share.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Secret Workshop of Jules Verne This is perhaps my favorite find on my most recent trip to Europe.  How can a place so wonderful exist in our world?  It's amazing.I got a recommendation from a close friend that told me I would love this place.  And he was right!  As usual, to see the full-size image, click Original in the menu that appears when you hover over the image in SmugMug.This is the Muséum national d'Histoire naturelle and is one of the least-known places in Paris.  Everyone goes for the hot tourist spots, and this museum sounds rather boring, yes?  But as you can see... au contraire!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Reflections on the Eiffel Tower Isn't it romantic?  What could be more perfect than a beautiful sunset here in Paris?There was a big storm all day long, but I could see the clouds were beginning to break up a little to the west, and I knew there was a possibility the sun would dip into an opening beneath the heavy clouds.  So, with that intense possibility, I headed over to the Eiffel Tower area hoping the light would turn out right...I also made a behind-the-scenes video.  Since you guys have been so nice over on Google+, I'll share that video exclusively there first, so be sure to stay tuned... I'm still editing the thing together!- Trey RatcliffRead more here at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Fourth on Lake Austin It was a tough night because I was on the edge of a bridge that was rumbling as cars went across. The evening was very windy, and there was a light driving rain right into my lens. I had to wipe down the lens after every few exposures and try to cup my hands over the top during the shot.  This ended up being the first HDR photo to hang in the Smithsonian, and it made my mom very proud.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Southern Lights in New Zealand I’m busy getting everything ready for the upcoming one-day event in Christchurch. I have a few surprises in mind, but they take a bit of preparation!I know that there will be many skill levels that I need to work with, and that’s okay. I think we’ll start really slow, then start moving faster and faster. Even when it gets a bit complex, I still think it will be interesting to new people!As for this photo, I took it during the amazing light show from the Aurora Australis down here on the south island of New Zealand.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

-The Great Wall of China-Wow I was alone here. As I walked along this ancient, original stretch of the Great Wall, I felt the ghosts haunting the old towers and little enclaves.I finally found an extremely remote part that is far enough away from civilization to stay pure. The ruins of the wall in this area has been overgrown with vegetation. When you walk along the top, you have to snake your way between huge bushes and all sorts of trees. Stairs and parts of the walkways have crumbled away in the past thousand years. The old towers are slowly fragmenting as lichens and moss cover parts of the stone that are decaying away.This has only reminded me that the main tourist part of the Great Wall is a very tiny stretch that has been re-built in recent years… so it is all fake and kind of Disney-wall. I don’t think I like that…That day I walked from tower to tower, looking at the sinuous wall as it snakes over the mountains. It’s so huge that I won’t even begin to come up with analogies… but, speaking of snakes, a family here told me to watch out for them. I kept that in mind as I hiked back in the pure black of night. I had a little flashlight to keep me company, along with my music. I didn’t see any snakes, and I didn’t fall down, so all together it was a great day and night.

The Chinese Technopolis How boring does the "Beijing Planning Museum" sound?  Very!How surprisingly awesome is the "Beijing Planning Museum"?  Very!The museum features a few giant city-models.  And I mean GIANT!  You can get a sense of the size of this thing by looking at the waist-height red rope around the outside.  Not only is this a fully detailed model, but each of the buildings light up individually in a cascade, corresponding to a dreamy Chinese voiceover.  The voice describes each sector of the city and what makes it unique.  There is music playing in the background that I could have sworn was the same music as "Jurassic Park", so that was a very strange addition to the scene.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Lijiang at Night This is the old town of Lijiang, China, where I spent the week with Tom Anderson (the MySpace guy).  I think I mentioned him before.  Anyway, we got to be friends over the past several months, and we ended up spending a week together here in the south of China.Tom had first been here many years ago when he was setting up the MySpace office in Beijing.  He had great memories, and he thought it would be great for a big return now that he is getting more into photography.  So, it was definitely a week full of non-stop photography action.One late night after the sun had set, we weaved through the old streets until we found this place.  Looking up, I knew it would be a wonderful place to take a photo, so I set up for this one.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Secret Crystal LakeThis remote lake was so icy cold.  You would think it's about 33 degrees or something, right?  It felt like absolute zero.  I dropped a little piece of my tripod in here and my hand almost froze off trying to retrieve it.In the distance you can see where the glacier comes into contact with the glassy lake; it gives a sense of the epic scale here.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Hong Kong from the Peak on a Summer's Night If you want to see how I made this (and how you can too!), visit my HDR Tutorial. I hope it gives you some new tricks!I had a long day waking up at 5 AM to take a series of subways and trains up to Shenzen for some meetings. I had a Chinese VISA, which you don't need to get into Hong Kong, but I had to use to cross the official Chinese border after getting off the train. I didn't realize that it was a one-time use VISA, and I had to go to Shanghai the next day. This caused a lot of problems with the Chinese officials, a body of government with which I do not enjoy causing problems.Anyway, after I got back to Hong Kong after a day in Shenzen, I was hot and sweaty and in the sort of meeting clothes that aren't great for being hot and sweaty in. But, everything about Hong Kong was still awesome and I had too look hard for things to complain about. The sun was setting, and I made it up to The Peak just in time for a shot.This was a 5-exposure HDR shot at 100 ISO, and, of course, a sturdy tripod to get all the lights as steady as possible.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Sunset in Ibiza Ibiza is a fabulous island off the coast of Spain that is the "in" destination for all the Euros that like to get trashed, party, dress in white, do medium-level-drugs, and stay on the beach without many clothes.I saw this girl bouncing around and very happy about something, so I went over and said hello, introducing myself.  She didn't speak much English, but I managed to ask her if I could take a photo of her.  She enthusiastically said yes, and I explained the sitch as we walked over to the water, mostly using interpretive dance to span the language gap.  She was Italian and her name was Wendy.  I think that is a strange name for an Italian, but I didn't question it.  Anyway, I asked her just to walk off into the ocean and I would take a photo.  She did just that, and I grabbed this shot just as the sun was dipping below the horizon.- Trey RatcliffThe rest of this entry resides here at stuckincustoms.com.

The Treetop Temple Protects Kyoto I'm just finishing up almost two weeks in Japan, and it has been an amazing trip! Usually I try not to start posting shots until the trip is at its close, and this is the first.While there, I spent time all over the country. I got a rail pass and just jumped on the bullet train to take me from one remote spot to another. I ended up with a few days in Tokyo to do my best to capture the city. I'll be posting photos from the trip throughout the next few weeks, months, and years, as usual. I hope this is a new line of photographs that will be interesting to you.Photographed here is the Kiyomizu-dera temple in Kyoto. The city is known for its traditional Japanese architecture, slower-paced life, natural beauty, graceful geishas, and zen peacefulness. I probably could have stayed in Kyoto capturing scenes the entire trip. I remained here until the sky turned black, and then I headed back down some winding streets to find an old small restaurant where the food was mysterious and every course was served with a gentle bow.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Approaching Mount Fuji from the Old Village What a perfect place this is!I’ve been to Japan many times, but I never had the chance to visit Mt. Fuji! This time, Tom and I made a point to do it, and this was one of our fist stops. You can see much more about it in the video above!- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

A Neo-Rockwellian Christmas When dad is a photographer, then there is a major degree of pressure to deliver photos on all the requisite holidays and celebrations! So, I decided to try to re-invent the family Christmas photo with HDR. Please note that many of my inventions go down in flames, but, as Winston Churchill said, “success is the ability to go from one failure to the next with no loss of enthusiasm”.Christmas scenes have a lot of light levels. The lights on the tree, the deep greens withn the branches, a roaring fire, lights in the room, reflections off the ornaments, and the like. It’s wild! I’m pretty sure this is why people like Christmas scenes so much - a wonderful treat for the eyes that is rich in texture and rich in light. Traditionally, it’s been very difficult to capture so much richness in a single photo, saving a lucky and heroic combination of shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and lenses.The tree lights made the faces of my three stunt-children (who are also my real children) glow perfectly. No flash could have achieved this, unless you are the kind of Rambo-flash guy that would go bury one inside the tree to hit their faces from the left. But, let’s face it. That’s hard.This was a 5-exposure HDR. You will notice that I often use 5 exposures, but note I could have done it with 3 exposures at -2, 0, and +2. Some silly Nikon cameras, like the D3X I use, will not let you step by twos, so I had to take 5 at -2, -1, 0, +1, and +2. The middle exposure, from which the kid’s faces were masked in and perfectly lit, was shot at f/4 aperture, shutter speed of 1/250, 100 ISO, and at 28mm.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

Farewell India I had a truly wonderful time in India and I can't wait to return.  After spending most of the day exploring the Taj Mahal, I found a car to take me across the river.  The bridge was over 100 years old and crowded with every type of locomotion - from donkey to pull cart to bike.  After working my way down to the river, I found I could not quite get low enough to take the photo I wanted.  So, reluctantly, I took my camera off my tripod and buried it in the mud, about half an inch above the water.  I spent all night in the bathroom saying I was sorry to the camera... cleaning her up back into her old self once again.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

The Road to Mount Cook along Lake Pukaki These lenticular clouds are pretty rare — but not on the south island of New Zealand! This is called the land of the long white cloud… I’m not sure of that means these lenticular clouds or not. Maybe a smart reader here on the blog can tell me!Anyway, I do love this photo… I think it is one of my new favorites…- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

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