Church in the Fog and Interview with Nikon

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New Interview with Nikon

Nikon has an official podcast where they talk all about Nikon stuff and stuff stuff like that. I didn’t know what it was going to be like before I was on, and I envisioned it would go like this:

[begin Stock Music Intro reminiscent of background music in porn movies]
Host: “So do you like stuff?”
Trey: “What, like Nikon stuff?”
Host: “Oh yeah, totally.”
Trey: “Well, yes, I do like Nikon stuff.”
Host: “Like all the Nikon stuff?”
Trey: “Well not all the Nikon stuff, but you know, some of the stuff.”
Host “Yeah totally.”
[fade out with same silly music]

But it turned out not to be quite like that…well, except for the music which I was spot on about… BTW, Nikon doesn’t pay me or give me free stuff stuff or any of that stuff.

Just click that lonely looking play button below:
[display_podcast]

If you want to see all my camera and lens suggestions (yes there is even a Canon in there, ahem!), see my HDR Camera recommendations page.

Daily Photo – Church in the Fog

I was driving along the southern coast of Iceland on the way to Vik, and I started going throw an area of lowlands. Around midnight or so, the sun was getting pretty low in the west, and it gave the sky a slight pink glow in almost every direction.

I shot this one at a 200mm at F/6.7. I don’t often take out my zooms for landscapes, but it does provide a nice compression that gives an unexpected feel to the final photo. It’s really hard to explain in words, but maybe you can sense of this framing in the final result. It just can’t be done with a wide-angle lens, even if I was a lot closer.

Church in the Fog I was driving along the southern coast of Iceland on the way to Vik, and I started going throw an area of lowlands.  Around midnight or so, the sun was getting pretty low in the west, and it gave the sky a slight pink glow in almost every direction.I shot this one at a 200mm at F/6.7.  I don't often take out my zooms for landscapes, but it does provide a nice compression that gives an unexpected feel to the final photo.  It's really hard to explain in words, but maybe you can sense of this framing in the final result.  It just can't be done with a wide-angle lens, even if I was a lot closer.- Trey RatcliffClick here to read the rest of this post at the Stuck in Customs blog.

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  • Susan

    Another one of those ‘dreamy’ ones you do so well and suitable for painting -super good Trey! The interview sounds funny – will have to listen!

  • http://www.jacquesgude.com Jacques

    Love the mist. I need to shoot more with my zooms, but I seem endlessly tied to my wide-angles. BTW, just signed up for the webinar, though missed the deadline for the previous price, so I suppose I’ll finally get to “meet” you there.

  • http://www.stuckincustoms.com Trey Ratcliff

    Thanks!

    Jacques – well I look forward to seeing you on Sunday then! :)

  • Patrick Ahles

    How do you know what music in porn movies sounds like? :p
    Great dreamy scene!

  • http://none Louis

    What an amazing shot,the colours and mist beautiful.l liked your interview you started out being very humble keep it up there is not much of that around now days.Saving for my trip to China now like to get to the cold over the crazy season as Ausie gets very hot that time of year.

  • Simon Morris

    Nice shot Trey – almost silhouette like what with the fading light, excellent!
    Yes, I couldn’t agree more regarding when to use the zoom – if you’d used the wide angle from this distance they’d be no details showing through… such as the two church windows with the tiny amount of light passing through – that, along with the fog wins it for me! I like those pink hues too – wonderful.
    Have a good weekend all :-)

  • Vicki Wilson

    Beautifl image, love the morning colors and mist!

  • http://open-window.typepad.com Claudia

    I love zoom and fully appreciate the benefits in this photograph. It’s a wonderful photo but I think the light coming through the church windows make it really special. Right time, right place, oh my!

  • http://timetotakepictures.blogspot.com/ Keith Moyer

    I have recently started using the zoom more often. Really great shot Trey! Love the soft colors.

  • http://bbsinghphotography.smugmug.com/ Bibek

    Patrick, That is what I was exactly thinking.

    Nice capture. I like the layer of fog and tone of the sky

  • Gail in Montana

    Wow, another great photo with a lot of blue, love this one, too!!! The misty fog adds intregue to the photo. Very soft colors, so beautiful!! Thanks for sharing, have a great Friday :-)

  • http://www.bfhstudios.com/blog Brian Hoffsis

    Ewww, a fully automated Nikon pseudo-HDR camera? Just point and shoot! Seriously though, is this the future of (HDR) photography?

  • http://www.shutterrunner.com Matty

    “BTW, Nikon doesn’t pay me or give me free stuff stuff or any of that stuff.”

    Well, they should! I, like many others, shoot Nikon because of you.

  • Andy Bird

    I quite often use my zoom for landscape stuff – if it helps the shot, then why not? Good effort!

    Brian – the day anyone releases a “point-and-shoot” HDR camera is the day I quit photography i’m afraid – let’s hope that never happens…..

  • http://www.stuckincustoms.com Trey Ratcliff

    Thanks all!

  • Jim

    Overrated hack with some nice toys. Overcooked images galore. This man is NOT a photographer and it’s a shame Nikon is giving him any exposure.

  • http://none Louis

    HDR was there long before we were born just because one man decides to bring it to the for I truly depict a bit of jealousy in the air,
    besides i feel we are going forward and what lies ahead only our children’s children will know. Remember its not what you want or prefer it the market. We as individuals are the minority, so sit back enjoy and watch the world go by and give the man credit for making a living and bring it to the people and making many happy and learning new things. Lets all enjoy and peace to brothers.

  • http://www.lowerpriceusa.com Meg

    The photo is simply amazing! I could sit and look at it for quite a long time!

  • http://www.hdrphotographyblog.com Scott Kublin

    Jim,

    Yes, you’re right and over 20,000 people are wrong. Feel better?

  • Baconroll

    Another great photo, maybe I’ll delay buy a wide angle lens a bit longer and stick with my 55-300

  • Simon Morris

    Bye, bye Jim – thanks for visiting! ;-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/media/set/fbx/?set=a.100925489989186.1637.100002152054198&ref=pd Thelonious Gonzo

    Dear post #16 –
    (I think it’s safe to assume that your real name isn’t Jim)
    Why do you care? Let’s assume you are correct and Trey has half the planet telling him they really are inspired by what he does and how he does it – BUT – he really isn’t even that good and we are all wrong. I ask again, why do you care? What’s it to you? Could it be that you are a hater who thinks he should be getting all the attention that Trey is getting and you’re bitter about your own status in this life?
    I got one piece of advice for you. Grow Up.
    You get what you earn in this life. Trey didn’t get here over night. He’s been putting out great work for several years and slowly he has built with hard work and persistence what you now envy and covet. He has made this little empire we call Stuck In Customs through sheer will and balls.

    I’ll fill you in on a little secret. A lot of people like and respect Trey for more than his photography. He’s a generous guy.
    Here’s another secret. Trying to tear down other people will never make you feel better. Build people up and you’ll be built up as well.

  • Andrea Boyle

    Right on, “TG”! And Trey, what lens do you usually use for landscapes? I assume a fixed lens, but…? See you Sunday! (I can’t wait!)

  • Roger Gatewood

    “Jim” may have chosen his words poorly but I have to admit that most of you who perceive this photography to be of high caliber reinforce the stereotype of an untrained eye that doesn’t know what good photography truly is. This technique is a gimmick and although Trey is good at it and the post-processing that comes with it – his images only stand out because of location. All I see is overused Lucis and poor composition. Scenes like this are NOT what my eye sees. I’m actually surprised to see the shot above w/o the heavy handed processing that he usually floods his shots with. The remainder of his work has no business being in the Smithsonian. Perhaps a more suitable spot for display would be a Spencer Gifts next to the blacklight posters.

  • http://www.facebook.com/media/set/fbx/?set=a.100925489989186.1637.100002152054198&ref=pd Thelonious Gonzo

    Rodg –
    Do you think the Black and Whites of Ansel Adams are what you would have seen if you had been standing next to him? Ummm… no. His use of “dodge and burn” techniques probably come off as really gimmicky to you.
    Do you think that the water lilies that ended up on Monet’s canvas looked like the actual water lilies he was looking at? Not unless he was dropping acid or drinking absinthe .
    I don’t think Trey is trying to capture and produce images that look like the same (sorry) boring work I see all over the place. You don’t like it? Cool. It’s a big ol’ web out there little fella. Go find what you DO like and pull up a chair.
    I have listened to and watched a ton of Trey interviews and I have noticed a trend. Trey NEVER talks about himself as if he is some sort of photography superhero. In fact quite the opposite. He admits easily that he had very little history and almost no training in photography. But somehow he has has ended up creating images that a lot of people like and some people do not.
    I really don’t have to defend Trey. In fact, I suspect that somewhere Trey is wishing I would stop posting on this topic. I only reply to people who drive-by and take shots at Trey because I can’t figure out what they hope to gain. I’m just curious I suppose.

  • http://none Louis

    Trey has promised a shot a day,its now up to the onlookers to say what he or she thinks. Yes i would agree that some of his shots are not up to standed but his fulfilling his promise to his clientele. Show me a photographer that every time he pushes the button his got the perfect shot or does not spend hours in the dark room burning in here and there and covering his wrongs.Yes, there are, not only what Tray does, but most HDR photographers do heavy handed processing, but art is in the eyes of the beholder, and we all have this choice of what we like. Yes, he has one in the Smthsonian so what, does not mean to say his good or bad.He is doing most of this for people who love the game (why game) well its a hobby to most, not all make a living from it,if they were all good as the complainers half the complainers would be out of work and the market would be flooded. I would not say its of high caliber but neither is every one perfect this is a blog to enjoy get ideas have fun meet people, share, let people learn from you make others happy so they to can enjoy their hobby.

  • http://www.stuckincustoms.com Trey Ratcliff

    Yes Thelonius, as you suspected, Jim and Roger have the same IP address.

  • Eric Narvaez

    The same jealous d-bags are writing insults on the Nikon Facebook wall. All the things these haters cry about are things Trey readily admits to. I am not jealous I can’t afford a D3, and even Trey said he uses one because he CAN! One guy even mentioned the rule of thirds! LOL that shit is funny right there! There is not a HINT of jealousy, it’s so bad grown men write nasty comments as if they were 8 years old. These guys are the ones when caught doing wrong cry “what about him” Jim, we all know you secretly want to be Trey, to have the expensive toys and the photo in the Smith, but sadly there is an evil lil bastard living just below the surface of your skin who can’t keep his mouth shut when jealousy takes over, and it’s the reason you’ll never succeed at anything but talking shit. Stay down and play the playground and when the adults are talking, go to your room!

  • Michael

    Art is not document. HDR is about art. Art is about breaking rules, and beauty is determined by the observer. Those who complain only reveal their own limited perspective and reveal the smallness of their ability to appreciate.

    The power of art can be measured by the intensity of evocation of the most harsh cynic.

  • Alda

    In Steven Pressfield’s book The War of Art he explains, “If you find yourself criticizing other people, you’re probably doing it out of resistance. When we see others beginning to live their authentic selves, it drives us crazy if we have not lived out our own. Individuals who are realized in their own lives almost never criticize others. If they speak at all, it is to offer encouragement. Watch yourself. Of all the manifestations of resistance, most only harm ourselves. Criticism and cruelty harm others as well.”

    “People try to rain on your parade because they have no parade of their own.” ~Jeffrey Gitomer

    3. As Heraclitus, the Greek philosopher wrote, “Dogs bark at what they don’t understand.”

  • http://chassinklier.com Chas

    It’s Church in the Mist – that’s mist, not fog mate – fog, Ha! ~:0)

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